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Sikhs religion Symbols - what do they signify

In the Sikh religion, there are quite a few symbols. However, only some of these symbols apply to all people. What I mean is that some of the major symbols of Sikhism only apply to those people that have been baptized. The major Sikh Symbols are:

 

Ek-Onkar

Ek-Onkar

The words Ek-Onkar have a firm place in Sikhism and it symbolizes a lot. The Guru Granth Sahib Ji opens with these words. Ek-Onkar means 'There is one God.' Many Gurdwaras and Sikh organizations use this symbol on letters and other documents. In fact, many Sikhs also use this symbol on their letters. This constant repetition of Ek-Onkar is done so that Sikhs are constantly reminded that there is only one God in the universe.

 

Khanda

Khanda

The Khanda, like Ek-Onkar is a very important symbol in Sikhism. The Khanda is commonly seen in Gurdwaras and on the Sikh flag. The Khanda symbolizes God's Universal and Creative Power. In it's center is a double edged sword, which symbolizes the primal and almighty power of the creator. The 'Chakra' or the circle is a symbol of the continuity. The two swords on the outside are symbols of the spiritual and political balance in the universe.

 

Kesh

Kesh

Kesh is one the 'Panj Kakar' or 'Five Ks' that people have after being baptized. However, Kesh, or uncut hair from everywhere on their body, is one of the two Ski's that most people have, even if they aren't baptized. Sikh males tie their hair into a 'Joora', or bun. They cover this with a 'Pag', or turban. At a younger age, people cover their Joora with a 'Patka', a smaller turban. Most females either braid their hair or put it in a bun on the back of their head. There are some women who tie and cover their hair like the men do. A lot of emphasis is put on Kesh because it is the body in the natural way that it was created by God.

 

Kangha

Kangha

The Kangha is another of the Panj Kakar, and it primarily in the possession of people who have been baptized. It is a comb and used for the cleanliness of the hair. Sikhs are asked to clean their hair in the morning and at bed time.

 

Kara

Kara

The Kara is the third of the Panj Kakar and it is the other Kakar that most people where, regardless of the fact whether they are baptized or not. The Kara is an iron or steel bracelet that binds the Sikh, who is wearing it, to God. The Kara is used to remind the Sikh to do the right deeds. The Kara is usually worn in the predominant hand so that the Sikh can see the Kara whenever he does anything.

 

Kachhera

Kachhera

The Kachhera is yet another of the Panj Kakar and it's worn by people who have been baptized. It ensures agility and freedom of movement. Kachhera is a form of boxer shorts that symbolize chastity and sexual restraint.

 

Kirpan

Kirpan

 

Nishan Sahib

Nishan Sahib

Nishan Sahib is the name for the Khalsa Flag. Saffron in color and of triangle shape it is a religious flag. It has a black Khanda in the middle. The flag post is also covered in saffron cloth and has a metallic Khanda at the top. Sighting of a Nishan Sahib gives the idea that there is a Gurdwara around.